WRITING

Every Fold Matters (script) by Lynne Sachs and Lizzie Olesker

Every Fold Matters by Lizzie Olesker and Lynne Sachs 1/28/15   ONE – worker (Ching) TWO – worker (Veraalba) THREE – customer (Tony) FOUR – Washing Society laundress (Jasmine)   PROLOGUE   Video montage of Chinese laundry worker Mr. Ho.                In a laundromat.   Customer looks into dryer and discovers his clothes are […]

Yes, No and an Occasional Maybe

I feel a closeness with writers, poets and painters, much more than with traditional film “directors.” We share a love of collage. In the kinds of films I make, there are fissures in terms of how something leads to something else. Relationships and associations aren’t fixed.

“Taking a Documentary Detour” – a mixed media lecture by Lynne Sachs

                Presented at: Les Encuentros del otro festival cine festival international de cine documental, Quito, Ecuador;  RIDE Risk/Dare/ Experiment Lecture at Pratt Institute; UC Berkeley Rhetoric Department; University of Southern California Cinema Department; Boston Museum School  “Art does not reproduce what we see; rather, it makes us see.” […]

Cinema & Curiosity: A Conversation between Alexandra Cuesta and Lynne Sachs

Alex: Since I was young I have always been curious about the world around me. I used to draw a lot, and make collages, but I never had an art education until I got to college where I decided to study photography without knowing why at the time. I didn’t get into filmmaking until much later, and I was never interested in conventional filmmaking- separation of roles, genres, storytelling.

Critics Page: “The Thing is No More” by Lynne Sachs in The Brooklyn Rail

I like making things. Objects that are distinct, take up space, have weight and texture, can be given as gifts, are occasionally sold, contain the very story of their making in the material of their being. And so it is with a stubborn adolescent fury that I refuse to believe that the work I do as a filmmaker is being pushed so quickly and definitively from the three dimensional into the digital and ultimately to the virtual world.

Rabbis of the Round Table

Back in 2004, I proposed to my husband Mark Street that I start a Torah study group for our half-Jewish-half-secular-humanist (the only unofficial faith or –ism he would embrace) 9 and 7 year-old daughters Maya and Noa Street-Sachs. He agreed reluctantly and skeptically, convinced that this passing fancy of mine for constructing a homemade form of religious learning would certainly go the way of Pilates or learning to cook.

Lynne Sachs interviews 3 New Day filmmakers from the Midwest

New Day filmmakers live all over the United States, although many are concentrated on the East and West Coasts. In the following interviews, New Day filmmakers from the Midwest reveal how living there has impacted their personal – and filmmaking – choices.