CURRENT

This Camera Fights Fascism in Otherzine

As a filmmaker and a long-term progressive activist, I have been thinking and talking about the connection between our media practice and the crisis that is our current political situation. From the environment to reproductive health to immigration, Donald Trump is trying to dismantle every aspect of the Obama legacy.

MM Serra discusses films of José Rodriguez Soltero

MM Serra, Executive Director of the Filmmakers Cooperative in New York City, discusses the 1960s Queer, count-culture, underground films of Rodriguez Soltero with friend and filmmaker Lynne Sachs

And Then We Marched

Filmmaker Lynne Sachs shoots Super 8mm film of the Jan. 21 Women’s March in Washington, D.C. and intercuts this recent footage with archival material of early 20th Century Suffragists marching for the right to vote, 1960s antiwar activists and 1970s advocates for the Equal Rights Amendment.

Tip of My Tongue premieres at Museum of Modern Art

“To mark her 50th birthday, filmmaker Lynne Sachs gathers a group of her contemporaries—all New Yorkers but originally hailing from all corners of the globe—for a weekend of recollection and reflection on the most life-altering personal, local, and international events of the past half-century, creating a collective distillation of their times. Interspersed with poetry and […]

Viva and Felix Growing Up

For the first three years of my twin niece’s and nephew’s lives, I used my 16mm Bolex camera to film them growing up in New York City with their two dads (my brother Ira Sachs and his husband Boris Torres) and their mom (Kirsten Johnson). The film ends with a Gay Pride Day embrace.

Cool Worlds and Sacred Pictures: Hurston, Clarke & Sachs

Ethnography is describing the Other. In the 1920s, writer and anthropologist Zora Neale Hurston reacted to this established view with her own artistic and scholarly works on everyday cultures in her own home in America’s black south. Hurston political and poetic studies of “folk cultures” that were mostly disparaged at the time are an expression of unmitigated appreciation and a way of taking up a position within the debate on “high” and “low” art in Harlem between the wars.