CURRENT

Proteus Gowanus Presents Your Day is My Night Interactive Film and Performance

This month, the Proteus Migration Film & Video Series will host a unique cinema-performance event which enacted throughout our various project spaces. Brooklyn-based filmmaker, Lynne Sachs, will bring us a specially designed evening of film and integrated movement pieces based on her recent work with a group of Chinese and Puerto Rican performers.

To your health, a poem

Here is a poem I wrote before the passage of Obama’s Health Care plan. The worry continues as we speed our way toward the next election.

Preview & Live Performance of “Your Day is My Night” by Lynne Sachs

The Round Robin Artist Collective has invited the cast and crew of my film “Your Day is My Night” to perform a live theater improvisation and interactive conversation at their Arts@Renaissance space in Greenpoint, Brooklyn on the evening of Thursday, March 8.

Dallas Video Festival interview with Lynne Sachs

“The wonderful thing about NYC is that you can experience so many different kinds of environments. This uncharacteristically sunny November afternoon I catch up with Lynne Sachs, who has had work screened at the last two VideoFest. I compliment her on her beautiful website and we talk about the use of text and media and history in her work.” Raquel Chapa, Ass. Dir. Dallas Video Festival

Roundtable on Digital Filmmaking in October Magazine

We are here to discuss the various ways digital technologies have, and have not, impacted experimental filmmaking. There was a time, in the mid-1990s, if not before, when some people argued that digital technologies were revolutionary and that they would fundamentally change filmmaking. Now that the dust has settled, or at least started to settle, and we can look back over the last fifteen or twenty years, the “digital revolution” might not seem like a revolution at all. We want to talk about both what has stayed the same and what has changed in experimental filmmaking thanks to the advent of digital technologies.

The Films of Gunvor Nelson by Lynne Sachs

The first time I saw Gunvor’s brash, feminist 1966 moving image carnival “Schmeerguntz”, I was about 25 years old, still too young (I thought) to identify with her funky discourse on motherhood and domesticity. In a sense, I watched Gunvor’s cinematic collaboration with her friend Dorothy Wiley as a child might furtively read her mother’s journals.

Blogcritic DVD Review: The Last Happy Day

In an interview with Otherzine experimental fil maker, Lynne Sachs talks about realizing “that there was a pattern emerging in my work, a rhythm between films that were open to changes brought by the times and films that followed a very clearly defined vision or concept. ” Later in the interview she relates what she is trying to do in her films to the avant garde poet, Gertrude Stein’s desire to “create provocative ruptures between the sign and the signifier, between the way we are taught to speak (to communicate) and the way we ultimately choose to express ourselves (art).”