PRESS

Lynne Sachs presents three films in Pamplona, Spain

A filmmaker who started work in the second half of the Eighties, Lynne Sachs effortlessly saunters between film, video, the internet and gallery installations. Principally concerned with the involvement of individuals in History, Lynne Sachs’ films often adopt the film essay form to explore the interrelationship between collective and subjective memory. Her films mix the most experimental and poetic of approaches with live recording, archive material and a range of narrative sources, all with the same air of ease.

Blogs and Docs interview with Lynne Sachs (Spanish)

Su estilo cinematográfico, siempre en movimiento, se ubica en la encrucijada del cine documental, experimental y de ensayo autobiográfico al mismo tiempo que transciende cualquiera de estas categorías preestablecidas. (Pablo Marin)

History of NYC reviews Abecedarium:NYC

A HISTORY OF NEW YORK website describes Abecedarium:NYC: “A wonderful, continuously expanding site sponsored in part by New York Public Library: Abecedarium:NYC. The whole thing seems designed to lead you down the path of hours spent exploring. The perfect site for people who love words as much as they love New York.”

Lynne in the NYT’s for Views from the Avant-Garde

Among the 60 or so titles on offer are new works by Leslie Thornton, Apichatpong Weerasethakul, Harun Farocki, Michael Snow, Peggy Ahwesh, Lewis Klahr, Ken Jacobs, Lynne Sachs, Ernie Gehr and other giants of the avant-garde, as well as a generous selection of films by emerging artists.

Jewish Week Review of “The Last Happy Day”

It would be tempting but altogether too glib to make a similar comparison between recent American documentaries and Lynne Sachs’ fascinating 38-minute film “The Last Happy Day.” Sachs takes a very unconventional approach to the Holocaust-related story of her distant cousin, a Jewish-Hungarian doctor named Sandor Lenard. Lenard fled Germany shortly before the war broke out, abandoning his medical practice and his non-Jewish first wife and son. He turned up in the unlikely haven of Fascist Italy, where he hid escaped POWs in his attic apartment in Rome. Eventually, he worked as a forensic anthropologist helping the American army’s Graves Registry unit in identifying the remains of GIs.

Abecedarium:NYC

Co-directed by Lynne Sachs and Susan Agliata with the support of the New York Public Library Abecedarium:NYC is an interactive online exhibition that reflects on the history, geography, and culture – both above and below ground – of New York City through 26 unusual words. Using original video, animation, photography and sound, Abecedarium:NYC constructs visual […]

Investigation of a Flame Reviews

“A complex rumination on the power of protest…..the trauma of the past, the continued mistakes of the present and the necessity to reflect actively on our government’s wartime antics.” The LA Weekly “A film to rave about, as well as reckon with.” The Independent Film and Video Monthly “Sachs’ elegant, elliptical documentary visits with surviving […]

Interview w/Lynne Sachs on Making “Wind in Our Hair” in Buenos Aires

Cold August winter in Buenos Aires. Lynne Sachs and a reduced crew are ready to begin the last shooting day of her first fictional opus. She chooses a small grove next to the Mitre’s train tracks in Palermo’s Park.

NOTE: This film’s title is now WIND IN OUR HAIR/ CON VIENTO EN EL PELO